Courses and Descriptions

All course descriptions are found in the 2021-2022 Prairie College Catalogue PDF.
The course descriptions are found starting on page 68 of this document.

Arts and Sciences Courses            
Aviation Courses 
Bible and Theology Courses                             
Business Courses
Christian Formation Courses                
Church and Ministry Courses                       
Humanities and Fine Arts Courses

Intercultural Studies Courses                                
Music Courses                                                  
New Testament Courses
Outdoor Leadership Courses                       
Old Testament Courses                                         
Pastoral Ministry Courses
Pilots Athletics Participation    

Science Courses         
Sports Management Courses
Social Science Courses                               
Spiritual Theology Courses
Theology Courses
Worship Arts Courses                                        
Youth Ministry Courses       

Arts and Sciences Courses

This course helps students integrate the biblical and theological material of their other courses into the wider cultural matrix of the current day. This is achieved by studying selected writings of Christians who have developed theological responses to a range of current issues, including feminism, consumerism, and general literacy. Students present their own theologies of culture to their peers through research papers presented in a series of symposiums.

Students who are not Seniors must get permission from the instructor.

Aviation Courses

No auditing

Prerequisite: SC 160 Meteorology with 70% final grade

Covers the Transport Canada academic requirements for the Canadian Private Pilot License. Sections include General Knowledge, Meteorology, Navigation, and Aviation Regulations.

No auditing

Requires concurrent enrolment in AV 100 Private Pilot Ground School

Requires a 2.7 cum gpa in previous non-AV courses, Class 3 medical (Class 1 preferred)

Partially fulfills Transport Canada’s minimum flight requirements for the PPL and establishes a solid foundation for all future flight training.

No auditing

Prerequisite: AV 123 Flight Practicum: PPL I

Requires a 2.7 cum gpa in previous non-AV courses, Class 3 medical (Class 1 preferred)

Partially fulfills Transport Canada’s minimum flight requirements for the PPL and establishes a solid foundation for all future flight training.

No auditing

Prerequisite: AV 124 Flight Practicum: PPL II

In this module, Class C Airspace is introduced along with the usage of radio navigation equipment and autopilot. Short/soft/rough airstrip and pilotage skills will continue to be developed.

No auditing

Prerequisite: AV 124 Flight Practicum: PPL II

Transitions pilot to another aircraft type: from tricycle gear to conventional (tailwheel) gear, or from conventional to tricycle. Low-level navigational skills will be developed along with the building of solo cross-country time.

No auditing

Prerequisite: AV 130 Flight Practicum: Initial Time and Experience

Requires minimum of 120 hrs when transitioning to 182RG or 210

Pilot will experience a higher speed aircraft and learn proper procedures for operating a constant speed propeller and retractable landing gear.

No auditing

Prerequisite: AV 132 Flight Practicum: Complex

Develops advanced flying skills including mountain navigation, unimproved airstrips, ridge crossings, canyon turns, downdraft/updraft and turbulence issues as well as visual illusions associated with mountain flying.

No auditing

Prerequisite: AV 100 Private Pilot Ground School

Requires PPAER passed, PPL Flight Test passed, 70% final grade in previous GS

Covers half of the Transport Canada academic requirements for the Canadian Commercial Pilot License. Topics include airframe, powerplant, and other aircraft systems.

No auditing

Prereq: AV 100

Requires 70% final grade in previous GS, Class 1 medical

Covers half of the Transport Canada academic requirements for the Canadian Commercial Pilot License. Topics include advanced meteorology, navigation, and theory of flight required for the Transport Canada commercial pilot written exam. Emphasis on the problem-solving and decision-making skills required of a commercial pilot.

The student will gain an understanding of the physiological, psychological, sociological and ergonomically based relationships that affect ones decision-making process. Students will learn to apply these concepts in practical risk assessment, threat and error management situations. In addition, students will learn how these concepts affect multi-crew cockpits, and how to apply this knowledge to effective crew resource management. The course is comprised of three elements. Building on the Human Factors studied in AV 100, students will investigate further the Human Factors that affect our decision-making. Students will be participate in a Safety Seminar that will examine a variety of human factors currently affecting aircraft operations. Students will then receive an introduction to crew resource management, gaining an understanding of how human factors impact, and are managed in multi-crew cockpits.

No auditing. The student will gain knowledge and experience in non-flying skills that are an integral part of commercial aircraft operations. This includes refueling, ground maneuvering, cleaning and marshalling. In addition students will learn how to plan, load and secure complex, mixed loads of passengers and cargo, keeping the aircraft within weight and balance limitations. The student will receive certifications in basic first aid and dangerous goods awareness (aviation).

No auditing

Requires concurrent enrolment in AV 130 Flight Practicum: Initial Time and Experience

Focuses on the completion of Transport Canada’s night rating requirements. It also emphasizes instrument navigation, human factors, and instrument flying.

No auditing

Prereq: AV 132 Flight Practicum: Complex

Requires CPAER passed, 135 hrs total time

Teaches the maneuvers specific to the Commercial Flight test (Precision 180 and Commercial Steep Turn) and brings all other exercises to a Transport Canada Commercial Standard.

No auditing

Explores the operational envelope of the aircraft and energy management of the aircraft through basic aerobatic maneuvers.

No auditing

Prerequisite: AV 132 Flight Practicum: Complex

Requires concurrent enrolment in AV 236 Flight Practicum: Multi Engine

Group 1 multiengine IFR training. Concludes with successful completion of Group 1 IFR flight test.

No auditing

Prereq: AV 132 Flight Practicum: Complex

Requires 150 hrs total time

Flight training in multi-engine aircraft. Concludes with successful completion of multi-engine flight test.

No auditing

Prerequisite: AV 130 Flight Practicum: Initial Time and Experience

Exposes students to the standards of the “commercial world” including accelerated flight planning, GPS and navigational aid usage, cargo and passenger loading, and more. These flights will build solo flight time towards the requirements for the Commercial License.

No auditing; Requires CPL licence, Class 1 medical

Covers the Transport Canada academic requirements for a commercial pilot seeking to become a flight instructor or a flight instructor wishing to renew an expired flight instructor rating.

No auditing; Requires Transport Canada CPL

Prereqs: AV 231, AV 312

Requires CPL license

You will complete a minimum of 30 hours of flight training required for the class 4 instructor rating.

Bible and Theology Courses

This two-week tour of Israel will focus especially on biblical sites unearthed by archaeologists. Students will have the opportunity to explore more deeply the nature of the places in which biblical characters lived, worked, and encountered God, as well as the historical and cultural dynamics in play in the Old and New Testament periods. The result will be a richer understanding of the biblical text, providing a foundation for a lifetime of faith and ministry.

BTH: requires 3.5 cumulative GPA and approval by instructor

This course provides experiential learning in a vocational-related area of biblical and theological studies. Usually involves research or teaching done in an academic, church or church-related setting. Supervision provided by experienced on-site personnel and a member of Prairie’s faculty.

BTH: requires minimum 3.5 cumulative GPA and approval by instructor

Working under the supervision of the instructor, each student designs and carries out research on a pre-approved topic.

BTH: requires application

Prerequisite: BT 403 Bible/Theology Directed Study

Additional Fee: Equivalent of half a credit

Working under the supervision of the instructor, each student writes a 30-40 page undergraduate thesis on a pre-approved topic.

Requires a minimum 3.5 cumulative gpa and approval by instructor.

Business Courses

Additional Fee: $100 The fee is used to bring in guest speakers, facilitate certain programmatic elements (like simulations), host business program functions and other curricular and co-curricular business program functions.

Taught in 2 or 3-week modules, dates, times, locations TBA

This class explores the dynamics and principles that are necessary for high functioning, missional organizations to exists. It starts with an examination of how the primary organization- the individual self (spirit/heart, mind, body, soul) – can be healthy, thriving and missional from a Scriptural perspective and then examines the organization of people around a collective purpose, primarily commerce. This course will develop a philosophical and theological basis for healthy and high performing organizations (teams) as well as examine best practices and principles (conceptually and experientially) to lead and develop people into missional and functional organizations. A high point of emphasis is reflection on the motivations, values, purpose and abilities that the individual student has/is called to in their life as a disciple of Christ.

Additional Fee: $100 The fee is used to bring in guest speakers, facilitate certain programmatic elements (like simulations), host business program functions and other curricular and co-curricular business program functions.

Taught in 2 or 3-week modules, dates, times, location TBA

This class will emphasize the fundamental knowledge and skills necessary to effectively understand and use financial statements in decision making. Students will learn how the accounting process works, its limitations and its uses. We will also examine different types of basic managerial decisions such as budgeting, cost analysis and cost control. The course will engage students in theological/spiritual reflection on the role of money in the Christian life and the Kingdom of God.

Additional Fee: $100 The fee is used to bring in guest speakers, facilitate certain programmatic elements (like simulations), host business program functions and other curricular and co-curricular business program functions.

Synopsis: Study of the business decisions and activities necessary to facilitate the creation, communication and delivery of value in the marketplace. Examines the product, price, promotion, and channel decisions faced by companies in domestic and intercultural markets. There will be a focus on the ethics of marketing based on the greatest commandment. Theological discussion and reflection around the intent, method and consequences of marketing and related business decisions will help students think through a Biblical and Christ-honoring approach to marketing.

Additional Fee: $100 The fee is used to bring in guest speakers, facilitate certain programmatic elements (like simulations), host business program functions and other curricular and co-curricular business program functions.

Synopsis: Study of microeconomics, providing a theoretical framework from which the operations of and interrelationships between individual markets are explained. The market system allows for effective coordination of economic decisions of consumers and business firms. This course provides the organizing structure for understanding the operations of the business firm and the markets that it serves.

Prerequisite: BU 111 Managerial Accounting

Synopsis: This class will examine the relevant laws to establishing and structuring a business in Canada. It will give some perspective to different challenges faced in various countries around the world. The class will also look at appropriate models and methods for governance in business consistent with both law and best practice. Risk Management.

Synopsis: A deep dive into the role of business in society and the kingdom of God. The class will examine the power of commerce to be either a bless or take from society. The class will emphasize Biblical perspectives on the role of work and business in participating in the redemptive work of God in society. Students will develop their own Biblically grounded philosophy of business in this class. Ethics in business will also be examined in this class.

Synopsis: This class will likely take place in a condensed seminar fashion. It will help students understand the relevance and practicalities of using data for decision making in business.

Prerequisite: SS 261 Leadership Foundations

Christian Formation Courses

Corequisite: CF 142

No auditing.

Open to students in CF programs only.

Can be substituted for a Bible/Theology elective. See the Registrar’s Office.

This is a pass-fail course for Christian Formation students only, involving the reading of high quality selected works that address aspects of Christian formation. The texts will vary from year to year and will include authors such as Wendell Berry, James M. Houston, C. S. Lewis, Emilie Griffin, J. I. Packer, Mark Buchanan and others. We will discuss perspectives, insights and issues that arise from the texts, with space for listening and prayer in the presence of Christ.

This course is required for as long as a student is in the Christian Formation diploma or degree program, up to a maximum of three years. Those at Frontier Lodge will join the course in Fall Term 2, but will receive full credit at the end of the year.

Corequisite: CF 141

No auditing.

Open to students in CF programs only.

Can be substituted for a Bible/Theology elective. See the Registrar’s Office.

This is a pass-fail course for Christian Formation students only, involving the reading of high quality selected works that address aspects of Christian formation. The texts will vary from year to year and will include authors such as Wendell Berry, James M. Houston, C. S. Lewis, Emilie Griffin, J. I. Packer, Mark Buchanan and others. We will discuss perspectives, insights and issues that arise from the texts, with space for listening and prayer in the presence of Christ.

This course is required for as long as a student is in the Christian Formation diploma or degree program, up to a maximum of three years. Those at Frontier Lodge will join the course in Fall Term 2, but will receive full credit at the end of the year.

Prerequisite: one of ST 100 The Christian Life, ST 103 Discernment and Discipleship

Can be substituted for a Bible/Theology elective. See the Registrar’s Office.

Spiritual theology focuses on the theology of spiritual transformation, growth and the life of Christian communion with God. In a way, spiritual theology is at the heart of Christian theology and it integrates theology with the spiritual practice of living the resurrection life in Christ by the Spirit. This course provides an introductory overview of the biblical, historical and systematic aspects of spiritual theology from an evangelical (i.e., gospel-centered) perspective. In addition, students will also engage in some of the practical, relational and habitual aspects of Christian formation.

Prerequisite: one of ST 100 The Christian Life, ST 103 Discernment and Discipleship

Location is Frontier Lodge

Can be substituted for a Bible/Theology elective. See the Registrar’s Office.

A tech-free course conducted at Frontier Lodge and area, in conjunction with two outdoor leadership courses and facilitated by Frontier Lodge staff, Explore instructors and interns, and a qualified spiritual director. Personal prayer, readings and journaling are interwoven with group prayer and adventure-based learning outings designed to develop foundational practices of Christian spiritual growth.
There is an additional course fee to cover outings and spiritual direction.

Corequisite: CF 242

No auditing.

Open to students in CF programs only.

Can be substituted for a Bible/Theology elective. See the Registrar’s Office.

This is a pass-fail course for Christian Formation students only, involving the reading of high quality selected works that address aspects of Christian formation. The texts will vary from year to year and will include authors such as Wendell Berry, James M. Houston, C. S. Lewis, Emilie Griffin, J. I. Packer, Mark Buchanan and others. We will discuss perspectives, insights and issues that arise from the texts, with space for listening and prayer in the presence of Christ.

This course is required for as long as a student is in the Christian Formation diploma or degree program, up to a maximum of three years. Those at Frontier Lodge will join the course in Fall Term 2, but will receive full credit at the end of the year.

Corequisite: Fall CF 241

No auditing.

Open to students in CF programs only.

Can be substituted for a Bible/Theology elective. See the Registrar’s Office.

This is a pass-fail course for Christian Formation students only, involving the reading of high quality selected works that address aspects of Christian formation. The texts will vary from year to year and will include authors such as Wendell Berry, James M. Houston, C. S. Lewis, Emilie Griffin, J. I. Packer, Mark Buchanan and others. We will discuss perspectives, insights and issues that arise from the texts, with space for listening and prayer in the presence of Christ.

This course is required for as long as a student is in the Christian Formation diploma or degree program, up to a maximum of three years. Those at Frontier Lodge will join the course in Fall Term 2, but will receive full credit at the end of the year.

Replaces 1 credit of CF 341 Readings in Christian Formation; students write an appreciation and critique of one of the texts in the Readings course.

Prerequisite: one of CF 212 Introduction to Evangelical Spiritual Theology, CF 231 Prayer, Community, and Creation

Can be substituted for a Bible/Theology elective. See the Registrar’s Office.

Corequisite: CF 342

No auditing.

Open to students in CF programs only.

Can be substituted for a Bible/Theology elective. See the Registrar’s Office.

This is a pass-fail course for Christian Formation students only, involving the reading of high quality selected works that address aspects of Christian formation. The texts will vary from year to year and will include authors such as Wendell Berry, James M. Houston, C. S. Lewis, Emilie Griffin, J. I. Packer, Mark Buchanan and others. We will discuss perspectives, insights and issues that arise from the texts, with space for listening and prayer in the presence of Christ.

This course is required for as long as a student is in the Christian Formation diploma or degree program, up to a maximum of three years. Those at Frontier Lodge will join the course in Fall Term 2, but will receive full credit at the end of the year.

Corequisite: Fall CF 341

No auditing.

Open to students in CF programs only.

Can be substituted for a Bible/Theology elective. See the Registrar’s Office.

This is a pass-fail course for Christian Formation students only, involving the reading of high quality selected works that address aspects of Christian formation. The texts will vary from year to year and will include authors such as Wendell Berry, James M. Houston, C. S. Lewis, Emilie Griffin, J. I. Packer, Mark Buchanan and others. We will discuss perspectives, insights and issues that arise from the texts, with space for listening and prayer in the presence of Christ.

This course is required for as long as a student is in the Christian Formation diploma or degree program, up to a maximum of three years. Those at Frontier Lodge will join the course in Fall Term 2, but will receive full credit at the end of the year.

Prerequisite: CF 212 Introduction to Evangelical Spiritual Formation

Can be substituted for a Bible/Theology elective. See the Registrar’s Office.

A biblical and historical survey seeking a theological basis for reframing a fully human psychology. Application will be made to specific areas such as trauma, addiction, and personality disorders.

Prerequisite: CF 212 Introduction to Evangelical Spiritual Theology

Can be substituted for a Bible/Theology elective. See the Registrar’s Office.

This intensive course prepares students to offer spiritual direction to others by exploring the history, theology, and practical dynamics of the direction process. Christian Formation and Counseling students who successfully complete this course may enroll in CM 479 Practicum in Spiritual Direction under the supervision of Urban Sanctuary as part of the Level 1 Spiritual Direction Certification track.

Church and Ministry Courses

Discover students only

Location is Discover field site in Africa

This practicum provides the student with a few weeks of practice in ministry for the purpose of integrating classroom input with experience in a cross-cultural setting. The practicum experience provides an overview of various forms of ministry in a number of facets of mission organizations but the primary focus is on the student as a disciple in development. We will focus on ministry based on the presence of God and our presence in a cross-cultural setting.

No auditing

Prerequisite: SS 210 Introduction to Psychology

Provides an introduction to the theoretical and practical foundation of interpersonal helping skills in the context of Christian ministry. Through active involvement the student will experience the basic process of helping others identify personal problems, set goals and move forward in their lives. Students will learn to recognize their role and what they bring into the helping relationship as a “skilled helper”.

This class is an immersion experience into an international and missional business. This experiential class places the student
into a new culture, business, and missions context. The minimum duration for the class is four weeks and is designed to
prepare the student for a longer-term, successful internship later on in their degree.

Available only on the field during the GlobeTrek year in BAIS

Co-requisite: CM 366 Cross-cultural Internship

The GlobeTREK internship is an 8-month immersion in other cultures, engaging in a number of formal and informal learning activities. For two months, students travel as a team and visit numerous different ministries, agencies and nations. For 6 months in the middle of the journey the student is involved in a ministry of their choice in a nation of their choice—for example, teaching ESL, working with orphans, teaching in a village school, teaching computer skills at a local radio station, working with local or international youth or children in a church, or working in a refugee camp are some of the possibilities. Expatriate mentors (preferably Canadians) and local supervisors will guide the student in their learning and practical experiences.

Available only on the field during the GlobeTrek year in BAIS

Co-requisite: CM 365 Cross-cultural Internship

The GlobeTREK internship is an 8-month immersion in other cultures, engaging in a number of formal and informal learning activities. For two months, students travel as a team and visit numerous different ministries, agencies and nations. For 6 months in the middle of the journey the student is involved in a ministry of their choice in a nation of their choice—for example, teaching ESL, working with orphans, teaching in a village school, teaching computer skills at a local radio station, working with local or international youth or children in a church, or working in a refugee camp are some of the possibilities. Expatriate mentors (preferably Canadians) and local supervisors will guide the student in their learning and practical experiences.

Develops and exercises vocational skills as part of a team ministering in another county.

Section 1–DSM students
Section 2–PN students

The Digital Media Practicum is a capstone experience that allows students to integrate what they have learned throughout the program.

Experiential learning is a major component of Christian ministry training at Prairie College. Students apply to become interns in the Explore Program and, if chosen, work with the directors of Explore to help facilitate the program.

Experiential learning is a major component of Christian ministry training at Prairie College. Students apply to become interns in the Explore Program and, if chosen, work with the directors of Explore to help facilitate the program.

Experiential learning is a major component of Christian ministry training at Prairie College. Students apply to become interns in the Explore Program and, if chosen, work with the directors of Explore to help facilitate the program.

Experiential learning is a major component of Christian ministry training at Prairie College. Students apply to become interns in the Explore Program and, if chosen, work with the directors of Explore to help facilitate the program.

The GlobeTREK internship is an 8-month immersion in other cultures, engaging in a number of formal and informal learning activities. For two months, students travel as a team and visit numerous different ministries, agencies and nations. For 6 months in the middle of the journey the student is involved in a ministry of their choice in a nation of their choice, with a focus on social justice issues. Expatriate mentors (preferably Canadians) and local supervisors will guide the student in their learning and practical experiences.

The GlobeTREK internship is an 8-month immersion in other cultures, engaging in a number of formal and informal learning activities. For two months, students travel as a team and visit numerous different ministries, agencies and nations. For 6 months in the middle of the journey the student is involved in a ministry of their choice in a nation of their choice—for example, teaching ESL, working with orphans, teaching in a village school, teaching computer skills at a local radio station, working with local or international youth or children in a church, or working in a refugee camp are some of the possibilities. Expatriate mentors (preferably Canadians) and local supervisors will guide the student in their learning and practical experiences.

Requires permission of Pastoral Coordinator

In consultation with the Pastoral coordinator, Dean’s Office and partnering churches, students will be placed in intentional ministry settings culminating their field training. Pastoral internships may be crafted to suit desired objectives (e.g. chaplaincy, pastoral leadership or parachurch ministry). Internships generally run 8-12 months in length.

• learn current practice-based methods from knowledgeable sport management practitioners within a field segment/organization of their choice
• apply theoretical content in a practical sport management-based setting
• develop, measure and evaluate their skill set and knowledge base, relative to the industry needs through a variety of means
• gain a greater appreciation for the role and function of sport management professionals
• work in conjunction with their Internship Supervisor and Faculty Advisor in the formation and implementation of their major project

Requires permission of Youth Coordinator

Experiential learning is a major component of Christian ministry training at Prairie College. Students work with the Dean’s office to arrange an Internship with a cooperating Christian ministry related to their field of study. Interns are supervised by a faculty member and a field supervisor as they complete the requirements of their designed Learning Contract.

Requires permission of Christian Formation Coordinator

Experiential learning is a major component of Christian ministry training at Prairie College. Students work with the Dean’s office to arrange an Internship with a cooperating Christian Ministry related to their field of study. Interns are supervised by a faculty member and a field supervisor as they complete the requirements of their designed Learning Contract.

Building depth on SP 230 Introduction to Sports Coaching and Performance. The focus is on experiential involvement in
coaching work. You will be mentored by an experienced coach.
Prerequisite: SP 230 Introduction to Sports Coaching and Performance

Digital Media Courses

An introduction of Digital Media for all the students enrolled in the Music & Worship Arts Program, this course will give students an overview of digital photography, social media design, video production, and filmmaking. Anyone who aspires to be a recording artist or worship pastor at a modern church will need to know the basics of how digital media works and how to work with visual artists. This course will help prepare recording artists, songwriters, musicians and worship leaders to co-work and complete projects and live events with visual artists.

Good digital media at its heart embodies storytelling, because as humans, this is the basis of all forms of communication. This course is an introduction to the concepts and practices of storytelling both in static and dynamic media. Instructors will speak from theoretical frameworks as well as personal experience to give students both a solid understanding of principles as well as examples of practical execution.

No auditing

Diploma in Digital Media students only

This course intends to provide a basic skill set whereby students can correct and enhance the audio portion of video projects for not-for-profit and mission-based organizations. Topics covered include Audio correction (dialogue), levels and mastering, Adobe link, and sfx tracks. We will be working in the multitrack editor and with waveform customization. Students should have at least two projects in their portfolio, in conjunction with their video projects to showcase auditions ability to improve audio. The course will be adaptive, meaning the instructor will adjust how much time is spent covering the basics. The projects that will be chosen, and their unique needs, will vary, also requiring adaptation.

No auditing

Diploma in Digital Media students only

This course intends to provide a basic skill set whereby students can correct and enhance the audio portion of video projects for not-for-profit and mission-based organizations. Topics covered include Audio correction (dialogue), levels and mastering, Adobe link, and sfx tracks. We will be working in the multitrack editor and with waveform customization. Students should have at least two projects in their portfolio, in conjunction with their video projects to showcase auditions ability to improve audio. The course will be adaptive, meaning the instructor will adjust how much time is spent covering the basics. The projects that will be chosen, and their unique needs, will vary, also requiring adaptation.

No auditing

Diploma in Digital Media students only

Students must have a new or up to 2-year-old Macbook, Macbook Air, or MacBook Pro with at least 8GB of ram; a 1 TB (minimum) external portable hard drive; a “student” subscription to the full version of Adobe Creative Cloud; and a DSLR (Digital Single Lens Reflex) camera body with HD video capabilities. We recommend a full-frame Canon body with a Canon EF 24-105mm f4L IS lens.

This course introduces the form of digital filmmaking, intending to provide a basic skill set whereby students can produce projects at a rudimentary level. Topics covered include pre- production, production, post-production, as well as basic gear use, basic software use (Premiere), and basic formats for projects so that the students will have a working knowledge sufficient to produce small scale, doc-style projects. Students should have at least two projects as part of their portfolio at the end of this course.

No auditing

Requires a “student” subscription to the full version of Adobe Creative Cloud.

A basic introduction to the wide variety of tools and applications of Adobe Photoshop & Adobe Bridge software. Students will learn part of what Photoshop is capable of doing and best practices in using it as a largely non-destructive editor. They will be exposed not only to the individual tools, but also to ways they can be used in combination and how to choose the best tools for each task. At the conclusion of the course, students should be versed in basic retouching and have some experience in creating more complex compositions. They should have at least two projects as part of their portfolio at the end of this course, and will have learned about the tools and resources available for ongoing learning.
Lab times allow one-one coaching, instruction and problem-solving.

No auditing

Students must have a new or up to 2-year-old Macbook, Macbook Air, or MacBook Pro with at least 8GB of ram; a 1 TB (minimum) external portable hard drive; a “student” subscription to the full version of Adobe Creative Cloud; and a DSLR (Digital Single Lens Reflex) camera body with HD video capabilities. We recommend a full-frame Canon body with a Canon EF 24-105mm f4L IS lens.

Fundamentals of Photography is a fast paced course introducing the basics of the craft, techniques, and concepts of photography. It is designed to make photography straightforward and easy to understand.

No auditing

Diploma in Digital Media students only

Additional Fee: $150 for material

Requires instructor’s permission; required equipment: newer Mac Laptop (min. 8 GB RAM), Adobe Creative Cloud, DSLR camera with HD video.

Portfolio is a practical, hands-on course designed to help first-year digital media students obtain a web presence as well as introduce them to professional ink jet printers and printing.

No auditing

Additional Fee: $175

Further examines Adobe Creative Cloud (Adobe CC) applications within a practical, real-world setting. Students will be presented with a client project and will work as a group to complete the client’s stated objectives accurately and within the project parameters and timelines.

No auditing

This course intends to introduce students to Adobe After Effects as it pertains to video editors. We will cover the basics of Masks, introduction to compositing, animating text, and basic motion tracking. Course flow and projects will be adapted to the needs and aptitudes of the students.

Prerequisite: DM 134 Fundamentals of Filmmaking and Premiere

No auditing

Students must have a new or up to 2-year-old Macbook, Macbook Air, or MacBook Pro with at least 8GB of ram; a 1 TB (minimum) external portable hard drive; a “student” subscription to the full version of Adobe Creative Cloud; and a DSLR (Digital Single Lens Reflex) camera body with HD video capabilities. We recommend a full-frame Canon body with a Canon EF 24-105mm f4L IS lens.

Provides a basic skill set whereby students can produce video projects for not-for-profit and mission-based organizations. Topics covered include pre-production, production, post-production, gear use, software use (Premiere), and formats for projects so that the students will have a working knowledge sufficient to produce small scale, doc-style projects. Reviews the elements of DM 134 and covers more advanced techniques for moving cameras and post- production. Students should have at least two projects as part of their portfolio at the end of this course.

Prereq: DM 144 Fundamentals of Photoshop

No auditing

Requires a “student” subscription to the full version of Adobe Creative Cloud.

This course serves as advanced practice with the wide variety of tools and applications of Adobe Photoshop software. Students will learn what Photoshop is capable of doing and best practices in using it as a largely non-destructive editor. They will be exposed not only to the individual tools, but how they can be used in combination and how to choose the best tools for each task. At the conclusion of the course, students should be versed in advanced retouching, effects and compositing. Students will learn about the tools and resources available for ongoing learning throughout their career. Students will have a final project as part of their portfolio at the end of this course.

Prerequisite: DM 145 Fundamentals of Photography

No auditing

Students must have a new or up to 2-year-old Macbook, Macbook Air, or MacBook Pro with at least 8GB of ram; a 1 TB (minimum) external portable hard drive; a “student” subscription to the full version of Adobe Creative Cloud; and a DSLR (Digital Single Lens Reflex) camera body with HD video capabilities. We recommend a full-frame Canon body with a Canon EF 24-105mm f4L IS lens.

Advanced Photography picks up where Fundamentals of Photography left off. It provides an advanced use of software applications, how to work in a studio environment with various types of lighting, and prepares students to master the controls of camera functions and strobe lighting.

Some classes may be held ‘on location’ in the Three Hills area

No auditing

An essential part of working in digital media is an understanding of marketing. Not only must good design be based on the principles of visual design, it must be able to sell a product, service, person or organization to the target audience. This course is an introduction to the concepts and practices of marketing both to and for clients. Instructors will speak from theoretical frameworks as well as personal experience to give students both a solid understanding of principles as well as examples of practical practice.

No auditing

Diploma in Digital Media students only

Additional Fee: $150 for material

Requires instructor’s permission; required equipment: newer Mac Laptop (min. 8 GB RAM), Adobe Creative Cloud, DSLR camera with HD video

Humanities and Fine Arts Courses

The course will start by identifying strategies for efficient comprehension of written and orally presented information. The student will be encouraged to use these strategies as they engage with each text. The follow-up will include verbal and written expression of the information gleaned from each activity – including paraphrasing (in one’s own words to demonstrate comprehension), summarizing, and basic reviewing of articles. Writing instruction will include a review of the structure of summaries, reviews and basic essays.

Cannot be applied to any academic program.

Credit not applicable to any academic program

This lab focuses on the basic elements of writing intelligent and compelling essays and trains the student to read critically. In addition, it will assist the student in different areas of academic life to improve his/her academic standing. This course is treated as a workshop where the work is done in class and special attention is given to each individual student to prepare them for further college education.

This course provides students with a solid grounding in the processes that writers use to communicate clearly in an academic context with a focus on the mechanics of writing college level essays and papers. Students will be introduced to strategies for developing an essay, enhancing writing skills, appropriate research procedures including using a library effectively, essay formatting and documentation.

Thinking and Writing uses a focus on critical examination of the many views opposing the Christian faith to teach the skills of research, argumentation, and writing. The student critically engages with various perspectives he is likely to encounter in the workplace. A variety of writing exercises develops his ability to address opposing positions through appropriate research, analysis of resources, and proper and prayerful argumentation.

The music that we write and love today comes from somewhere. It’s like a branch connected to the trunk and ultimately the roots of the tree. Our enjoyment of the current branch of music will grow as we are able to survey and take in the beauty of the full tree. This class will be an overview of the essence and history of music. Together we will explore why music moves us emotionally and what the connection is between music and spirituality.

Available only on the field during the GlobeTrek year in BAIS

Prerequisite: one of HF 110 Written Composition, HF 111 Thinking and Writing

An on-the-field introduction to a language.

Prerequisite: one of HF 110 Written Composition, HF 111 Thinking and Writing

Examines events and themes which make up the early history of what is known as ‘western civilization’. The chronological range extends from the earliest known civilizations of the Near East through the end of the medieval period (15th century) in Europe. Although related historical events in other parts of the globe will be used as reference points, the primary stage will be the regions of the Mediterranean basin and the wider European subcontinent. The course focuses on the formative roles of key events, people, and ideas.

Prerequisite: one of HF 110 Written Composition, HF 111 Thinking and Writing

Covers the development of the modern period in the West. While using political/military events as the primary chronological reference points, the course also explores a variety of themes which shaped the modern age. These themes include religious/philosophical ideas, especially as they are expressed in art, architecture, music and literature; developments in the fields of science and commerce; and social structures/attitudes. In addition to the study of these developments, the course will also give students a first-hand introduction to research/interpretation practices essential to the craft and academic discipline of history.

Prerequisite: one of HF 110 Written Composition, HF 111 Thinking and Writing

A survey of the major historical and thematic contours in western philosophy from a Christian perspective. The first half of the course focuses on the major historical milestones in the history of western philosophy beginning with the pre-Socratics and continuing with philosophers from classical antiquity, the medieval period, the enlightenment, and modernity. In the second half, the focus shifts to the major thematic emphases in contemporary philosophy. Throughout the course, particular attention will be paid to relationships between Christianity and the philosophical themes under consideration.

Available only on the field during the GlobeTrek year in BAIS

Prerequisite: HF 221 Field Language I

A continuation of HF 221 Field Language I.

Prerequisite: one of HF 231 History of Western Civilization I, HF 232 History of Western Civilization II

Students who have received credit for HF 534 cannot receive credit for this course

Covers the history of the church from the first century A.D. through the later medieval period. Explains key doctrinal, cultural and missionary developments in both the western and eastern churches. Students also receive an introduction to basic issues in the craft of historiography, with the goal of developing an understanding of how the discipline of history relates to the Christian faith.

Prerequisite: one of HF 231 History of Western Civilization I, HF 232 History of Western Civilization II

Students who have received credit for HF 535 cannot receive credit for this course

Delves into the history of the church, primarily in its western expression, from the reformations of the sixteenth century to the beginning of the twenty-first century. A primary theme is Christianity as a missionary faith which moved across cultures and adapted to different settings, while at the same time transforming the cultures into which it moved. A second theme is that of stagnation and renewal within a range of institutional church settings. Although theological developments are covered, a greater emphasis is placed on the people and their practices which defined church life and Christian cultural engagement.

Prereq: HF 242

An orientation to contemporary moral philosophy. Students will gain an understanding of major methodological distinctions as well as key contemporary issues. Voices from both within and beyond the Christian community will be attended to in an effort to address concerns of individuals and the global community. A leading question will be whether public ethical discourse can be coherent in the twenty-first century.

Additional Fee: equivalent to 1/2 credit

This course is a combination of seminar and individual tutorial in which students will be required to develop a research topic, identify the key authorities on the topic and their respective interpretive positions and articulate their own critical response.

Prerequisite: HF 403 Humanities Directed Study

This course is a combination of seminar and individual tutorial in which students will produce a research paper based on the topic of study and their findings from HF 403. In addition to interacting with the key authorities on the topic, they will be expected to integrate their position on the topic as a critical response to their research findings. In writing their paper students will need to clearly articulate both thesis and methodology being used in presenting their material. In addition to submitting a written essay students will also have opportunity to present a summary of their paper in a seminar forum.

Intercultural Studies Courses

Additional Fee: $85

In order to be an effective witness for Christ today a student needs to have a basic understanding of the beliefs/doctrines and practices of the major world religions. After this survey of the ideas, philosophy, doctrine, and major practices of the main religions we will also discuss how our Gospel witness can be/should be contextualized to people from a particular world religion. We will not include Christianity or Judaism in our study. Includes visits to places of worship in Calgary.

This one-credit course will prepare you to understand and appreciate what God is doing around the world today. God is a missionary God who is reaching out to humankind. We begin with an overview of “mission” in the Bible, followed by an express train ride through history. We will look at current day “missions” methods, needs, future, and how to engage in sharing Christ in Canada through our words and actions.

Instructor permission required; open to Discover students only.

Main teaching location is Discover field site in Africa. Also meets on-campus during first week of Winter semester

This course will help equip students for successfully entering and living within a culture other than their own. It will be organized around the themes of “Know, Be, and Do:” what needs to be known or understood, what kind of person succeeds, and what skills are necessary to live and minister well in another culture. Requires active engagement in learning outside the classroom in order to contribute to the learning experience in the classroom. Includes Lab.

For Discover students only

Lab accompanying IS 257 Intercultural Competence

BDBA/IS:
BDBA/IS students only.

BAIS, DIS :
BAIS, DIS students only.

Requires instructor’s permission; students enrolled by Registrar’s Office.

Coreq is IS 261 in following Summer.

Students with credit in IS 257 will audit IS 259 and IS 261. Audit fee will apply.

May also meet during semester break and between Term 2 final and graduation.

This course will help equip students for successfully entering and living within a culture other than their own. It will be organized around the themes of “Know, Be, and Do:” what needs to be known or understood, what kind of person succeeds, and what skills are necessary to live and minister well in another culture. Requires active engagement in learning outside the classroom in order to contribute to the learning experience in the classroom.

BAIS, DIS students only.

Requires instructor’s permission; students enrolled by Registrar’s Office.

Coreq is IS 259 in preceding Winter.

Students with credit in IS 257 will audit IS 259 and IS 261. Audit fee will apply.

May also meet during semester break and between Term 2 final and graduation.

This course will help equip students for successfully entering and living within a culture other than their own. It will be organized around the themes of “Know, Be, and Do:” what needs to be known or understood, what kind of person succeeds, and what skills are necessary to live and minister well in another culture. Requires active engagement in learning outside the classroom in order to contribute to the learning experience in the classroom.

Available only on the field during the GlobeTrek year in BAIS

Prerequisites: IS 140 World Religions, SS 170 Christianity in the 21st Century World, SS 273 Cultural Anthropology

This course deals with foundational principles for communication between people from different cultures. Students learn to be aware of the influence of thinking processes, worldviews, verbal and non-verbal behaviours. Also covers aspects of anxiety and uncertainty that everyone faces when communicating with someone from a different culture.

Current hot topics in the area of missions are discussed as preparation for the student entering and working in cross-cultural settings. This is the capstone course for the IS students and their interests will be taken into consideration when choosing the topics.

Music Courses

BAM/MWL and DMWA only

Addition Fee: $325 for 30 min lesson, $487.50 for 45 min lesson, or $650 for 60 min lesson per week

No auditing; lessons must be scheduled at same time on same days throughout the semester

Private lessons are taught weekly on a one-to-one basis. Subject material is chosen by the instructor from a range of styles and genres to meet the needs of each student while fulfilling the guidelines set out by each respective area. Students are expected to participate regularly in performance classes. End-of-semester performance juries serve as final exams.

Addition Fee: $325 for 30 min lesson, $487.50 for 45 min lesson, or $650 for 60 min lesson per week

No auditing; lessons must be scheduled at same time on same days throughout the semester

Private lessons are taught weekly on a one-to-one basis. Subject material is chosen by the instructor from a range of styles and genres to meet the needs of each student while fulfilling the guidelines set out by each respective area. Students are expected to participate regularly in performance classes. End-of-semester performance juries serve as final exams.

BAM/MWL and DMWA only

Addition Fee: $325 for 30 min lesson, $487.50 for 45 min lesson, or $650 for 60 min lesson per week

No auditing; lessons must be scheduled at same time on same days throughout the semester

Private lessons are taught weekly on a one-to-one basis. Subject material is chosen by the instructor from a range of styles and genres to meet the needs of each student while fulfilling the guidelines set out by each respective area. Students are expected to participate regularly in performance classes. End-of-semester performance juries serve as final exams.

Addition Fee: $325 for 30 min lesson, $487.50 for 45 min lesson, or $650 for 60 min lesson per week

No auditing; lessons must be scheduled at same time on same days throughout the semester

Private lessons are taught weekly on a one-to-one basis. Subject material is chosen by the instructor from a range of styles and genres to meet the needs of each student while fulfilling the guidelines set out by each respective area. Students are expected to participate regularly in performance classes. End-of-semester performance juries serve as final exams.

Corequisite: MU 168

Ear training and Sight-singing is a core requirement for all musicians; it assists them in mastering the technical and stylistic aspects of an instrument, in notating original music and arrangements, and in understanding what they are hearing. In this course, students will develop basic ear training & sight reading skills through performance and dictation. They will study melodies, intervals, harmony, and solfege in major keys, as well as basic rhythms in the most common meters.

Corequisite: MU 167

Ear training and Sight-singing is a core requirement for all musicians; it assists them in mastering the technical and stylistic aspects of an instrument, in notating original music and arrangements, and in understanding what they are hearing. In this course, students will develop basic ear training & sight reading skills through performance and dictation. They will study melodies, intervals, harmony, and solfege in major keys, as well as basic rhythms in the most common meters.

By audition

BAM/WLM, DMWA students only

This vocal ensemble is a made up of a select group of auditioned singers. The repertoire is primarily sacred and encompasses a wide range of styles. The ensemble presents a major performance at Christmas and Easter.

By audition

BAM/WLM, DMWA students only

This vocal ensemble is a made up of a select group of auditioned singers. The repertoire is primarily sacred and encompasses a wide range of styles. The ensemble presents a major performance at Christmas and Easter.

No auditing

The Community Choir is designed to provide Music and Worship Arts students with an opportunity to gain further experience and opportunity to sing in a large ensemble. Voice part singing along with a variety in repertoire will provide the music student with ample opportunities to improve their vocal singing as well as part and blending components

No auditing. The Performance Ensemble class is designed to give Music and Worship Arts students practical experiences in singing and in playing their instrument as part of a larger music ensemble. Students will be placed into groups and through a given assignment will practice the art and craft of creating and playing music together.

The Performance Ensemble class is designed to give Music and Worship Arts students practical experiences in singing and in playing their instrument as part of a larger music ensemble. Students will be placed into groups and through a given assignment will practice the art and craft of creating and playing music together.

Addition Fee: $325 for 30 min lesson, $487.50 for 45 min lesson, or $650 for 60 min lesson per week. No auditing; lessons must be scheduled at same time on same days throughout the semester. Prerequisite: MU 155 Music Lessons. Private lessons are taught weekly on a one-to-one basis. Subject material is chosen by the instructor from a range of styles and genres to meet the needs of each student while fulfilling the guidelines set out by each respective area. Students are expected to participate regularly in performance classes. End-of-semester performance juries serve as final exams.

Addition Fee: $325 for 30 min lesson, $487.50 for 45 min lesson, or $650 for 60 min lesson per week. No auditing; lessons must be scheduled at same time on same days throughout the semester. Prerequisite: MU 155 Music Lessons. Private lessons are taught weekly on a one-to-one basis. Subject material is chosen by the instructor from a range of styles and genres to meet the needs of each student while fulfilling the guidelines set out by each respective area. Students are expected to participate regularly in performance classes. End-of-semester performance juries serve as final exams.

Addition Fee: $325 for 30 min lesson, $487.50 for 45 min lesson, or $650 for 60 min lesson per week. No auditing; lessons must be scheduled at same time on same days throughout the semester. Prerequisite: MU 155 Music Lessons. Private lessons are taught weekly on a one-to-one basis. Subject material is chosen by the instructor from a range of styles and genres to meet the needs of each student while fulfilling the guidelines set out by each respective area. Students are expected to participate regularly in performance classes. End-of-semester performance juries serve as final exams.

The Performance Ensemble class is designed to give Music and Worship Arts students practical experiences in singing and in playing their instrument as part of a larger music ensemble. Students will be placed into groups and through a given assignment will practice the art and craft of creating and playing music together.

The Performance Ensemble class is designed to give Music and Worship Arts students practical experiences in singing and in playing their instrument as part of a larger music ensemble. Students will be placed into groups and through a given assignment will practice the art and craft of creating and playing music together.

Addition Fee: $325 for 30 min lesson, $487.50 for 45 min lesson, or $650 for 60 min lesson per week. No auditing; lessons must be scheduled at same time on same days throughout the semester. Prerequisite: MU 155 Music Lessons. Private lessons are taught weekly on a one-to-one basis. Subject material is chosen by the instructor from a range of styles and genres to meet the needs of each student while fulfilling the guidelines set out by each respective area. Students are expected to participate regularly in performance classes. End-of-semester performance juries serve as final exams.

Private lessons are taught weekly on a one-to-one basis. Subject material is chosen by the instructor from a range of styles and genres to meet the needs of each student while fulfilling the guidelines set out by each respective area. Students are expected to participate regularly in performance classes. End-of-semester performance juries serve as final exams.

BAM/MWL and DMWA only

Addition Fee: $325 for 30 min lesson, $487.50 for 45 min lesson, or $650 for 60 min lesson per week

No auditing; lessons must be scheduled at same time on same days throughout the semester

Private lessons are taught weekly on a one-to-one basis. Subject material is chosen by the instructor from a range of styles and genres to meet the needs of each student while fulfilling the guidelines set out by each respective area. Students are expected to participate regularly in performance classes. End-of-semester performance juries serve as final exams.

The Performance Ensemble class is designed to give Music and Worship Arts students practical experiences in singing and in playing their instrument as part of a larger music ensemble. Students will be placed into groups and through a given assignment will practice the art and craft of creating and playing music together.

By audition

BAM/WLM, DMWA students only

This vocal ensemble is a made up of a select group of auditioned singers. The repertoire is primarily sacred and encompasses a wide range of styles. The ensemble presents a major performance at Christmas and Easter.

Addition Fee: $325 for 30 min lesson, $487.50 for 45 min lesson, or $650 for 60 min lesson per week

No auditing; lessons must be scheduled at same time on same days throughout the semester

Prerequisite: MU 355 Music Lessons

Private lessons are taught weekly on a one-to-one basis. Subject material is chosen by the instructor from a range of styles and genres to meet the needs of each student while fulfilling the guidelines set out by each respective area. Students are expected to participate regularly in performance classes. End-of-semester performance juries serve as final exams.

Addition Fee: $325 for 30 min lesson, $487.50 for 45 min lesson, or $650 for 60 min lesson per week

No auditing; lessons must be scheduled at same time on same days throughout the semester

Prerequisite: MU 355 Music Lessons

Private lessons are taught weekly on a one-to-one basis. Subject material is chosen by the instructor from a range of styles and genres to meet the needs of each student while fulfilling the guidelines set out by each respective area. Students are expected to participate regularly in performance classes. End-of-semester performance juries serve as final exams.

BAM/MWL and DMWA only

Addition Fee: $325 for 30 min lesson, $487.50 for 45 min lesson, or $650 for 60 min lesson per week

No auditing; lessons must be scheduled at same time on same days throughout the semester

Private lessons are taught weekly on a one-to-one basis. Subject material is chosen by the instructor from a range of styles and genres to meet the needs of each student while fulfilling the guidelines set out by each respective area. Students are expected to participate regularly in performance classes. End-of-semester performance juries serve as final exams.

The Performance Ensemble class is designed to give Music and Worship Arts students practical experiences in singing and in playing their instrument as part of a larger music ensemble. Students will be placed into groups and through a given assignment will practice the art and craft of creating and playing music together.

By audition

BAM/WLM, DMWA students only

This vocal ensemble is a made up of a select group of auditioned singers. The repertoire is primarily sacred and encompasses a wide range of styles. The ensemble presents a major performance at Christmas and Easter.

New Testament Courses

Winter section: Explore students only

Since this course builds on the skills introduced and developed in OT 112 Reading the Torah, it is strongly recommended the students take OT 112 first.

In this course, students are introduced to the story of Jesus Christ and his earliest disciples as told by the four Gospels and the book of Acts. Students will grow in their understanding of who Jesus is as well as in their ability to interpret the bible by attending to its literary, historical, and theological character.

Explore students only

A study of the person, works and words of Jesus Christ as set forth in the four Gospels. Special attention given to Mark’s Gospel, the Sermon on the Mount, and the Gospel of John. Interpretation will consider the social and religious settings of Second Temple Judaism, the shape and intent of each Gospel narrative, and missional appropriation of the text. Skills will be developed in Greek word recognition, pronunciation, and the use of a lexicon.

Prerequisite: NT 112 Reading the Gospels and Acts

This course is an exercise in the disciplined and attentive listening to the text of Scripture as given in Paul’s letters. Sound interpretive skills will be practiced to discern what the text meant to its first recipients and what it means for church communities today. In reading the text, more focused attention will be given to the historical/cultural situations of the letters and the ways the gospel is contextualized.

Prerequisite: NT 221 Reading Paul’s Letters

This course will be an exercise in the disciplined and attentive listening to the text of Scripture as given in James, the letters of Peter, John and Jude, the sermon to the Hebrews and the Apocalypse. In reading the text, more focused attention will be given to genre, literary context, and appropriation.

This course is devoted to the interpretation of Revelation. Students will sharpen their biblical interpretation skills by attending to Revelation’s historical, literary, and theological character. Students will also critically attend to the ways in which Christians have interpreted Revelation in the past as they interpret what it means for the church today.

Outdoor Leadership Courses

Explore and Christian Formation students only

Location is Frontier Lodge

This class is an introduction to the skills, knowledge and principles necessary to understand and use the experiential education method effectively. Students will experience the model throughout their time in the Explore Program, but concentrated time is set aside to learn about how the student can facilitate experiences towards the learner’s growth and development. A three-day seminar, paired with a practicum opportunity will form the main means of curriculum delivery and application. The experience and practice of the concepts from this class, however, are found throughout the entirety of the program.

Explore students only

Location is Frontier Lodge

Wilderness Advanced First Aid training is the entry level certification for outdoor professionals, guides and instructors who work in a wilderness setting. Course content extends beyond urban-based first aid programs to include elements inherent in leading groups in the outdoors and guiding wilderness adventures. Special emphasis is placed on prevention of injuries, accident scene management, leadership, leader responsibility and liability, advanced first aid kits, wound management and managing the trauma victim.

Explore students only

Location is Frontier Lodge

This class serves to provide students, both in theory and practice, with a framework for understanding leadership. In particular, this class hopes to provide students the knowledge necessary to successfully lead or follow well in the Outdoor context. This class will present the transactional and transformational model of leadership to students as a framework for understanding how leadership works from the perspective of leader, follower or from an undefined role. The class addresses but moves past leader/follower functions to examine how “leadership” can come from anywhere, given a proper understanding and application of power, authority and influence.

Christian Formation students only

This class serves to provide students a framework for understanding leadership both in theory and in practice. This class will present the transactional and transformational model of leadership to students as a framework for understanding how leadership works from the perspective of leader, follower or from an undefined role. The class addresses but moves past leader/follower functions to examine how “leadership” can come from anywhere, given a proper understanding and application of power, authority
and influence.

Location is Frontier Lodge

Explore students only

Location is Frontier Lodge

Provides foundations and skills in the area of planning and implementing experiences within the context of outdoor ministry. Students will be exposed to significant philosophical and ethical foundations for experiential education. Emphasizes the preparedness of the teacher in the areas of character and readiness. Includes extensive experiential education as well as time for reflection. Students will lead and teach in varied situations and settings, including planning and implementing an entire camp retreat.

Diploma OL, Explore Interns only

Location is Frontier Lodge

This course provides the participants with a range of instructional experiences in order to prepare them to effectively minister through adventure. Instructional experiences include canoe instruction, swift water rescue, swift water instruction opportunities, adventure race planning and management, and orienteering training. Instructional experiences will focus on equipping participants with basic skill sets and on translating adventure environments into ministry opportunities.

Diploma OL, Explore Interns only

Location is Frontier Lodge

This course provides the participants with a range of instructional experiences in order to prepare them to effectively minister through adventure. Instructional experiences include canoe instruction, swift water rescue, swift water instruction opportunities, adventure race planning and management, and orienteering training. Instructional experiences will focus on equipping participants with basic skill sets and on translating adventure environments into ministry opportunities.

Diploma OL, Explore Interns only

The focus of this course is on the philosophy of adventure business and management as it applies to developing and sustaining programs. Students are challenged to discover their personal ministry philosophy and values, and express them through the creation of a future business/ministry dream. This includes understanding how philosophy and values are key driving forces in all areas of business/ministry such as program development, use of staff and discerning ministry needs.

Explore Interns only

This class exists to give direction and focus to the elements needed to prepare interns for service in the Explore program. Interns will work on Frontier Lodge summer staff and participate in spring and summer camp ministry. There are certain elements of their summer that need to be accomplished in order to be most prepared for success in the program. Interns will receive the training and opportunity over the summer to satisfactorily complete all the objectives in this syllabus. This class works on the pass/fail system. All objectives will need to be completed before credit is awarded for this class.

Diploma OL, Explore Interns only

Location is Frontier Lodge

Emphasis is on theoretically and practically investigating the affected aspects and effective leadership of teaching/ coaching in adventure and competitive environments. Includes developing a Christian philosophy of teaching in an adventure context along with designing an effective teaching environment.

Explore Interns only

Location is Frontier Lodge

The student will be responsible to work within a team to plan a team-focused backcountry trip. The student will develop a purpose and vision for the trip, and plan the trip according to the desired outcomes for the trip participants, with elements that will “create an environment” conducive to the planner’s hopes and goals.

This class serves as an elective opportunity for OL students to learn about the Adventure Tourism industry in a cross cultural context. Students will travel to Western China where we will partner with Jim Hamp and his adventure tourism business. The first part of the trip will be focused on experiencing and understanding the Western, rural Chinese culture. The second part of the trip will be focused on the adventure tourism industry and how this industry can be used as/on mission for Kingdom building. The third part of the trip will be spent working on outdoor skills in a new environment (the Himalayans) interacting with the rural and/or nomadic Chinese culture and participating and learning how to run an adventure tourism trip.

The pursuit of certifying and non-certifying outdoor leadership skills training. The skills being learned can be hard skills such as rock climbing, mountain biking or navigation, or can be soft skills focused in terms of facilitation, leadership and education, or a combination of soft and hard skills. This course is designed for upper level Outdoor Leadership students who are working to focus their skills in specific areas of interest.

Dip OL, Explore Interns only

The focus of this course is on understanding and applying biblical ethical principles for facilitating a group through a variety of wilderness experiences. Through theory and practice students will learn how to construct and utilize teachable moments, encourage processing of experiences, and manage group learning and development.

Old Testament Courses

A study of the first five books of the Bible, focusing on the historical, literary and theological features of these books as well as establishing a strong grounding in Torah principles as preparation for interpreting the rest of Scripture.

Interim section may have assignments due before course begins and/or after it ends–contact instructor.

Prerequisite: OT 112 Reading the Torah

A study of the books of Joshua, Judges, 1 and 2 Samuel, and 1 and 2 Kings in their cultural, historical, and literary setting. Brief interaction with Ruth and 1 and 2 Chronicles as they relate to the books associated with them. Focuses on interpretive and contextual issues, historical setting, cultural concerns, and their relevance in developing a strong biblical theology in today’s world.

Prerequisite: OT 221 Reading the Old Testament Historical Books

A study of Psalms, Job, Proverbs and Ecclesiastes, focusing on historical, literary, and theological features of these books with special emphases on Hebrew poetry and ancient Near Eastern Wisdom literature. In particular, this class is designed to shape our worship with the Psalms and cultivate curiosity, nourish reflection, and invite wonder as we ponder the mysteries of God’s wisdom.

Prerequisite: OT 221 Reading the Historical Books and OT 343 Reading the Psalms and Wisdom Literature

A study of the Latter Prophets (Isaiah, Jeremiah, Ezekiel, and the Twelve), with Daniel and Lamentations, focusing on developing sensitivity to the historical, literary, and theological dimensions of these books. Class time will include discussion of the relevance of the prophetic books for contemporary critical issues.

Pastoral Ministry Courses

Additional Fee: $100 for field trip and material

An orientation to personal coaching and gospel centered living in its relation to ministry. In-class and out-of-class practicum involves small group coaching networks and observation. Students will learn and be attentive to coaching as understood in the ministry life of Jesus.

An introduction to the competencies that are essential for an effective pastoral ministry. Includes both academic and practical issues. The course is taught by full time pastors and establishes the foundations of Prairie’s pastoral program.

An orientation to the art of Biblical preaching and teaching; students will become familiar with foundational elements of sermon construction. Learners will become skilled in their personal style and develop regular weekly messages that they will preach and teach in real life environments. Praxis will be on and off campus.

Students who have credit in YO 314 Youth Communications cannot take this class for credit.

Additional Fee: $400 for road trip

This course focuses on a Biblical understanding and appreciation of God, as a missional God and the church as God’s missional agent in the world. Explores the genesis and development of new initiatives as a substantial ministry in the life of a Christ follower. Students will have hands on training and study in the observation, development and rebirth of new missional initiatives. As well, students will formulate a personal missional philosophy for ministry. The pastoral core competencies of evangelism and leadership stem from this course.

Additional Fee: $400 for road trip

This course focuses on a Biblical understanding and appreciation of God, as a missional God and the church as God’s missional agent in the world. Explores the genesis and development of new initiatives as a substantial ministry in the life of a Christ follower. Students will have hands on training and study in the observation, development and rebirth of new missional initiatives. As well, students will formulate a personal missional philosophy for ministry. The pastoral core competencies of evangelism and leadership stem from this course.

Pilots Athletics Participation

Members of the Men’s and Women’s Pilots athletic teams are eligible for credit upon completion of all of the requirements involved in participation on a Pilots team.

Members of the Men’s and Women’s Pilots athletic teams are eligible for credit upon completion of all of the requirements involved in participation on a Pilots team.

You will be challenged to grow as a disciple of Christ through your active participation in the Pilot’s futsal team. Pilot’s participation fosters this discipleship through physical, mental, social, emotional and spiritual challenges, which the athlete faces in each practice and competition; individual improvement as an athlete; participation in team development; and connecting with individuals and teams from other colleges.

Members of the Men’s and Women’s Pilots athletic teams are eligible for credit upon completion of all of the requirements involved in participation on a Pilots team.

Members of the Men’s and Women’s Pilots athletic teams are eligible for credit upon completion of all of the requirements involved in participation on a Pilots team.

Members of the Men’s and Women’s Pilots athletic teams are eligible for credit upon completion of all of the requirements involved in participation on a Pilots team.

You will be challenged to grow as a disciple of Christ through your active participation in the Pilot’s futsal team. Pilot’s participation fosters this discipleship through physical, mental, social, emotional and spiritual challenges, which the athlete faces in each practice and competition; individual improvement as an athlete; participation in team development; and connecting with individuals and teams from other colleges.

Science Courses

This class is designed to equip you with the skills and knowledge to understand personal health and wellness and then also to encourage or instruct others in that way. The Explore section focuses on wilderness disciplines; the on-campus section uses the resources made available by the Alberta Fitness Leadership Certification Association (AFLCA).

Explore students only

Location is Frontier Lodge

This class is a highly experiential class that introduces students to different forms of backcountry travel and recreation. Students will also be introduced to both the concepts and the practice of winter survival. Preparation, judgment, teamwork, leadership and decision-making are all central themes to the outdoor pursuits of ice climbing, backcountry skiing, winter camping and survival and will be common subjects that will be learnt throughout the course activities.

Consent of Aviation; no auditing

Requires a 2.7 cumulative GPA in previous non-AV courses

This course is an introduction to the study of the atmosphere and its changes. It gives an overview of the practical principles that affects air masses and weather systems. Identification of meteorological phenomena and their applications will be discussed.

Consent of Aviation; no auditing

Requires a 2.7 cumulative GPA in previous non-AV courses

This course is an introduction to the study of the atmosphere and its changes. It gives an overview of the practical principles that affects air masses and weather systems. Identification of meteorological phenomena and their applications will be discussed.

This course surveys the historical development of scientific thought, primarily in the western tradition, from its origins in ancient Greece to the twentieth century. While the course does examine major figures and their scientific achievements, it does not do so in the context of “science as the inevitable march from primitivism to progress” i.e. science as the continuous accumulation of knowledge and mastery of the natural world. The course will look at scientific activity in each historical era as the quest to answer the pressing questions of the day about humankind’s relationship with the natural world. As such the course will focus on the interaction between science and religious/philosophical concerns.

Social Justice Courses

This course is an introduction to global social justice issues within biblical perspectives and global understandings. The course also covers the development of human rights including political, historical, and philosophical viewpoints.

Prerequisite: SS 314 Social Psychology

GSJ students only

This course will introduce the basic elements of project management with a focus on Project Cycle Management (PCM). This method as employed by many non-profit organizations and international development agencies works through the stages of project identification, design, appraisal, proposal preparation, and monitoring and evaluation.

Available only by DE on the field during the GlobeTREK year in BAIS.

Field Contextualization is designed to equip students to recognize, examine and implement the various contextualization models used in modern missions. Students will understand their philosophical foundations, strengths and weaknesses, and demonstrate how a model of their choosing might be applied in a particular context.

Sports Management Courses

An introduction to sports management. Primary focus is on sport industry, including professional sport entertainment, amateur, for-profit and nonprofit sport participation, sporting goods, and sport services. Students will examine applications of managerial concepts and processes, and look at the ways in which sport organizations interact with each other, and with corporations, the government and non-governmental organizations. Micro aspects of management applied to sport, including human resources, sport marketing, sponsorship, finance, event management, and sport law.

Sport and leisure not only play a significant role in many people’s lives but have developed into large industries that exert a large influence within culture. Christians wishing to engage in sport and leisure actives at any level should do so thoughtfully, aware of both the positive and negative potential results. The role of sport and leisure in Christian life has begun to receive more serious and nuanced attention by academics and pastoral leaders within the Christian church. The goal of this course is for students to enter into this conversation and be introduced to the study of sport and leisure through a theological lens. Students will learn how sport and leisure has historically been viewed within the Christian church and will, throughout the course, be challenged to question their own views on sport, competition, and the ethics of play from a theological viewpoint.

Developing a greater understanding of human behavior within the sport and exercise setting is an important asset for professionals working in related fields such as fitness instructing, athletic training, sport administration, coaching and recreation planning. This course covers theories of motivation, the impact of stress on performance, the psychological benefits of exercise, strategies for promoting exercise adherence, and the role of mental skills for performance and well-being

The intent of this course is to provide the learner with an overview of the sports tourism industry and to provide them with some of the basic tools needed to successfully plan a sporting event. Learners will be introduced to the sports event and sport tourism industries and be given the opportunity to explore such topics as risk management for sporting events, volunteer management and event sponsorship. Students learn the basic skills needed to conduct a fundraising campaign on behalf of a non-profit organization

This course will investigate the historical foundations and the current development, operation, and biblical justifications for sport outreach programs within church and partner organizations.

Building depth on SP 230 Introduction to Sports Coaching and Performance. The focus is on experiential involvement in
coaching work. You will be mentored by an experienced coach.
Prerequisite: SP 230 Introduction to Sports Coaching and Performance

A centennial overview of the history of sports as a global cultural phenomenon. Topics of study include: the nature of leisure behavior; historical, ethical, social, and economic aspects of the sports industry; the terminology of sports; and the forces that have affected the growth of sports as a business.

Prerequisite: SS 261 Leadership Foundations

In this course students will study leadership concepts in relation to sport, physical education and coaching. Students will examine the role of the leader and the responsibility which comes with becoming a leader. Topics such as personal management, relationship management and conflict management will be covered

Social Science Courses

Introduces students to practical concepts of communication and challenges them to apply these concepts in the contexts of interpersonal and group communication.

Additional Fee: $30

Provides an overview of artistic layout, design, aesthetics, and marketing and integrates a Christian worldview and biblical principles. This course introduces fundamental design principles relating to colour, typography, grid layout, corporate branding and marketing, and Christian ethics in the design industry.

Additional Fee: $20 for guest speakers

“What in the world is God doing today?” Perhaps a better question is “What is God doing in the world today?” God is a missionary god, but His mission is far more encompassing and diverse than most Christians in the western world know. The course begins with an overview of the biblical narrative of the mission of God, continues with some key themes in the history of the spread of Christianity, and then undertakes a global tour of how the Gospel is making its home in the diverse cultures of the world of today. Using historian Andrew Walls’ dual themes of Christianity as a pilgrim faith and a homing faith, we will see that God’s mission of reconciling the world to himself in Christ Jesus is creative, costly and compelling.

Prerequisite: one of HF 110 Written Composition, HF 111 Thinking and Writing

An introduction to the major psychological perspectives on human behaviour and cognitive processes including sensation, perception, learning, memory, cognition, human development, motivation, emotion, personality, health, disorders and therapy. Psychological principles are discussed in light of a Christian worldview and their contribution to a broader understanding of human behavior.

Prerequisite: one of HF 110 Written Composition, HF 111 Thinking and Writing

Explores the sociological perspective of aging. Builds a foundation in sociological concepts and theories to apply this knowledge to issues of aging. Considers the demographic forces leading to population aging; biological and psychological change and their social impact during aging; and aging in relation to the health care system, economy, and social programs in Canada.

This course is a biblical, theological, sociological and practical study of sexuality, singleness and marriage. Current issues will be explored in each of these areas, to equip students in pursuing and promoting healthy relationships. Overall, the course deals with our identity and its impact on our sexuality, singleness and marriage.

Prerequisite: one of HF 110 Written Composition, HF 111 Thinking and Writing

Introductory course that explores a theology and philosophy of leadership, surveys some of the primary tasks of leaders, and investigates formation of Christian leaders. Provides a foundational study to grow as a Christian influencer.

Additional Fee: $70

Prerequisite: one of HF 110 Written Composition, HF 111 Thinking and Writing

The course is an introductory overview of Cultural Anthropology—the study of human beings from a holistic perspective. We will study theory, insights, and methods used to understand people and their relationships in human cultures. We will learn to understand some basic rationale for different ways of life and how to apply general anthropological knowledge and skills to everyday life in Canada or overseas. The topics include the concept of culture, world view, social organization (kinship, economic, social groups, political, and religious/ideological organization), communication, life cycle, expressive culture, and change.

Prerequisite: SS 210 Introduction to Psychology

A study of human development through the lifespan from conception to death, focusing on the physical, cognitive, social, moral and faith characteristics at each life stage. Particular emphasis will be placed on development from childhood through adolescence.

Prerequisite: SS 210 Introduction to Psychology

Social psychologists are interested in the impact that social environment and group interactions have on attitudes and behaviors. This course explores the way in which feelings, thoughts, beliefs, and intentions are constructed and how these factors influence our decisions and interactions with others.

Available only on the field during the GlobeTrek year in BAIS

Prerequisite: SS 273 Cultural Anthropology

During the six months in one place, you will do participant observation, spontaneous short interviews, long interviews, life stories, and use any other ethnographic research method you choose. You will work on this throughout your time—always asking the question, “What is going on here?” The end result is an interesting narrative about living in the culture and learning to become an insider.

Prerequisite: one of SS 264 Leadership and Power, SS 314 Social Psychology

GSJ students only

This course will introduce the basic elements of project management with a focus on Project Cycle Management (PCM). This method as employed by many non-profit organizations and international development agencies works through the stages of project identification, design, appraisal, proposal preparation, and monitoring and evaluation.

Spiritual Theology Courses

Fall section reserved for PN’s, PCP’s, AAMA students

With the Bible as the textbook, course content explores Christian spiritual theology and practice, not as a formula or recipe, but rather as a transformational relationship with the triune God. Students are challenged to actively engage in the intentional and faithful pursuit of relationship with God, both inside and outside of the classroom, through biblically patterned spiritual exercises.

Explore students only

With the Bible as the textbook, course content explores Christian spiritual theology and practice, not as a formula or recipe, but rather as a transformational relationship with the triune God. Students are challenged to actively engage in the intentional and faithful pursuit of relationship with God, both inside and outside of the classroom, through biblically patterned spiritual exercises.

Ever wonder how to discern God’s will for your life? This is a question most disciples of Jesus wrestle with at one time or another. Students will be faced with that question, and grapple with the biblical call of Christ to live as His apprentice and to make disciples of all peoples. This course includes experiential education components which will help form authentic disciple- making. The course also offers a full weekend off-campus retreat.

This section men only

Additional Fee: $75

May be substituted for ST 100

Requires interview with Director

Corequisite: ST 206

To audit see Registrar’s Office

A Christ-centred biblically based 12-Step discipleship program that is purposed toward healing for individuals struggling with personal problems such as compulsive, addictive or unhealthy behaviours. Jesus offers healing and this course is intended to facilitate leading students to Christ in order to receive such healing.

This section men only

Additional Fee: $50

May be substituted for ST 100 The Christian Life

Prerequisite: ST 205 Freedom Session and Authentic Living

To audit see Registrar’s Office

A Christ-centred biblically based 12-Step discipleship program that is purposed toward healing for individuals struggling with personal problems such as compulsive, addictive or unhealthy behaviours. Jesus offers healing and this course is intended to facilitate leading students to Christ in order to receive such healing.

This section women only

Additional Fee: $75

May be substituted for ST 100

Requires interview with Director

Corequisite: ST 208

To audit see Registrar’s Office

A Christ-centred biblically based 12-Step discipleship program that is purposed toward healing for individuals struggling with personal problems such as compulsive, addictive or unhealthy behaviours. Jesus offers healing and this course is intended to facilitate leading students to Christ in order to receive such healing.

This section women only

Additional Fee: $50

May be substituted for ST 100 The Christian Life

Prerequisite: ST 207 Freedom Session and Authentic Living

To audit see Registrar’s Office

A Christ-centred biblically based 12-Step discipleship program that is purposed toward healing for individuals struggling with personal problems such as compulsive, addictive or unhealthy behaviours. Jesus offers healing and this course is intended to facilitate leading students to Christ in order to receive such healing.

Theology Courses

This course introduces students to the biblical, doctrinal, philosophical and historical “big picture” outlines of the Christian faith. The course aims to equip students with the skills to develop a Christian mind by assisting them in constructing a theological foundation for thinking and dealing with life’s most important issues. This course will also enable students to begin to think theologically and to construct a Christian worldview for the edification of the community of faith and to the glory of the almighty God whom we serve.

Preference given to PN’s, PCP’s

This course introduces students to the “big picture” of the Christian faith in the context of medical care and emergency medical services. The course has a special focus on the vocation of work, theology, and spiritual care. It will enable students to think theologically and ethically about their vocation and develop a Christian worldview for the edification of the community of faith and to the glory of the almighty God whom we serve.

Prerequisite: TH 100 Introduction to Christian Theology

A systematic orientation to the center of Christian theology—the life of the Triune God. This course will cover the doctrines of God, Trinity, Christ, the Holy Spirit, and Revelation. It will also consider questions of method, including the sources and norms of theology. The discipline of theology will be approached as a practice of the church, both local and global, carried out for the benefit of the church’s life, its proclamation, and its service to the world.

Prerequisite: TH 210 The God of the Gospel

A systematic orientation to the work of God and the response of humanity. This course will cover the doctrines of Creation, Humanity, Sin, Salvation, the Church, Scripture, and Last Things. As in its companion course, the discipline of theology will be approached as a practice of the church, both local and global, carried out for the benefit of the church’s life, its proclamation and its service to the world.

Available only on the field during the GlobeTrek year in BAIS

Prerequisite: TH 100 Introduction to Christian Theology

This course will look at God’s mission and the biblical foundation for doing mission–including the nature and purpose of God, mission in the Old and New Testament, the essential missionary task, and the instruments of mission. We will also examine a number of contemporary models/paradigms/theologies of mission.

Prerequisite: one of TH 210 The God of the Gospel, TH 211 Creation to New Creation

A study of the development of Christian theology from the early Church through to the Reformation. The course traces the historical factors that have been significant in the formulation of Christian doctrine with a view to contemporary relevance.

Prerequisite: one of TH 210 The God of the Gospel, CF 212 Introduction to Evangelical Spiritual Theology

A study of the development of Christian theology from the Reformation through to the present. The course traces the historical factors that have been significant in the formulation of Christian doctrines with a view to contemporary relevance.

Prerequisite: one of HF 110 Written Composition, HF 111 Thinking and Writing AND one of TH 210 The God of the Gospel, TH 211 Creation to New Creation

Deepens and expands the introduction to apologetics given in HF 111 Thinking and Writing. Examines various methodologies as well as objections and issues students are likely to encounter. Students gain familiarity with the evidences for the factuality of Christianity and learn how to refute non-Christian systems of thought. They are encouraged to develop a more incarnational (life-style) apologetic.

Worship Arts Courses

Worship has been described as a multifaceted jewel. No matter what side from which the jewel is viewed, there is always something new to see, a new depth to experience. Individuals seeking to lead congregational worship have undertaken a fascinating and lifelong journey. What view does the worship leader have of the worship of the triune God? What part of worship is most familiar? What part is most challenging? This course seeks to introduce the student to the breadth and depth of topics that encompass worship leading and ministry.

Building depth on SP 230 Introduction to Sports Coaching and Performance. The focus is on experiential involvement in
coaching work. You will be mentored by an experienced coach.
Prerequisite: SP 230 Introduction to Sports Coaching and Performance

Building depth on SP 230 Introduction to Sports Coaching and Performance. The focus is on experiential involvement in
coaching work. You will be mentored by an experienced coach.
Prerequisite: SP 230 Introduction to Sports Coaching and Performance

Worship students only

This course will introduce you to the basics of how songwriting works and will cover the primary building blocks of lyrics, melody, harmony and rhythm as well as song structure. Students will have a chance to try their hand at songwriting in a safe and instructive environment. This course also explores questions such as: How a songwriter can influence culture? What are the functions of music in society?

Worship Arts students only

In this course you will sharpen your lyric, harmony and melody writing skills. You will learn tools and strategies to generate better ideas, develop them, and work with structure and form in order to build them into great songs. This course also explores questions such as: Where does inspiration come from and how we encourage creativity? What are the distinctions between writing for a church service and a community audience? How can we influence culture through songwriting? Students will have the experience of writing songs individually as well as co-writing.

Worship Arts students only

Prerequisite: WA 121 Songwriting 1

This course is a continuation of Songwriting 1, building on a foundation of fundamentals for all aspects of songwriting. We will dig deeper into the art and skill of writing lyrics with depth and emotional punch. We will explore working with the words of Scripture in the songwriting process as well as continue to explore melodic development and chord progressions. Most importantly, we will listen to great songs from multiple genres and interact with students’ songs with a goal of continual improvement.

Worship Arts students only

Introduction to the foundations of the language of music based on the three aspects: Melody, Harmony and Rhythm. This is an overview of the basics of reading and writing music, setting a foundation for writing songs, music charts and for self-publishing music via computer software.

Worship Arts students only

Prerequisite: WA 123 The Language of Music 1

This course expands the language and resources for writing melodies, harmonies, and rhythm. We will learn a variety of scales, build a broad harmonic base and understanding (intervals and chords), and create a variety of rhythms and time signatures (i.e. compound and hybrid time). Students will begin to put the three elements together. Ear training and sight reading will be part of the daily class content and students will learn to transcribe what they hear.

Worship Arts students only

Prerequisite: WA 122 Songwriting 2

This course is a continuation of Songwriting 1 & 2 and is a project-based course. The focus of this course is the writing and preparation of songs for the student’s EP. By the second half of the course, each student will be expected to present all the songs they feel are ready to be considered for their EP recording.

Worship Arts students only

This course will cover the concepts of arranging songs with regard to the essence of the song being creatively expressed through rhythm, harmony, and form. Practically, students will apply these concepts to writing lead sheet and charts for rhythm section with vocals (solo and parts) and/or featured instruments. The students will be using music software (Sibelius) to create arrangements for song assignments as well as their own songs.

Worship Arts students only

This course introduces students to basic audio recording: including digital recording, tracking & editing. There is an emphasis on critical listening and analysis, as well as discussion of music and musical form. We will also explore how to think critically about music from an artistic view as well as a Christian viewpoint.

Worship Arts students only

This course focusses on applying the foundations of melody, harmony, and rhythm in creating and writing chord progressions, harmonies, instrumental parts, song transcriptions, and original songs. Students will learn to develop arranging and composing skills through writing and analysis. Transcriptions by ear will be part of the daily class time to prepare students for writing and publishing their own lead sheets and arrangement charts.

Worship Arts students only

Prerequisite: WA 228 The Language of Music and Writing

Students will learn to create professional music charts using music manuscript and the Sibelius Music software. Basic foundations for writing arrangements of songs will also be introduced. This course will be more project-based as students will work on charting their own songs as well as others that will be given for assignments and exams giving them the opportunity to be self-publishers of their musical creations.

What is the mindset of a ‘working musician?’ What are the essential marks of a musician who is in demand? How does a musician make a living and navigate the new music business realities? How does a musician, singer, artist and one who uses music in ministry best serve an audience? This course will provide a foundation of understanding and knowledge in how musicians work.

Worship Arts students only

In this course students will have a chance to learn from several highly qualified professionals in the music industry. Students will learn how to select and hire a winning team of advisors and structure their commissions and fees; navigate the ins and outs of record deals, songwriting, publishing, and copyrights; maximize concert, touring, and merchandising deals; understand the digital streaming services; and how to take a comprehensive look at the rapidly transforming landscape of the music business as a whole

This course is designed to lead the student in a study of worship through the content of the Old Testament, New Testament, and early centuries of Church history. The study will establish a foundation upon which the practices of worship will be discussed and evaluated. Does God require humankind to approach him in a certain way? Major components of worship practices and their meaning comprise the study of biblical sources and early Christian history. Is it God’s story we tell or is it our story to live?

This course is designed to lead the student in a study of corporate worship through the content of gathered worship service activities. Not only are worship service components studied and reviewed, the delivery of the elements is also examined. Service parts such as sermon, communion, baptism, parent/child dedication, funeral, wedding, seasonal days, prayer, and Scripture reading will be examined. Students will be encouraged to consider their own service tradition and compare it with other forms in the Christian tradition. The course will involve the student in widening and deepening their perspective and understanding of the relationship between general worship design and the individual service elements. This understanding will contribute to the student’s overall concept of the purpose of worship and the role of the worship leader/planner.

The corporate worship service of a local, Christian congregation will be the focus of this course through exploring and studying a variety of worship service design methodologies where each method brings with it its own set of ideas and implications. Students will study the philosophical background of service design methodologies with the intention of using evaluative tools and methods to quantify the pros and cons of various service designs

Can be substituted for a Bible/Theology elective. See the Registrar’s Office.

What is the relationship between worship and Christian formation? How is the Church leadership and congregants formed through week-by-week corporate worship services? Is this a missed category when thinking about how people are discipled in the Christian faith? An introduction to the use and meaning of rituals, symbols, and how people grow in faith will be discussed to assist the student to begin the development of a philosophy of worship as Christian formation

DMWA students only

Recording an EP is where the student does what songwriters, recording artists and songwriting worship leaders do in the real world: they make a record of their creative work. This course is that – recording the EP under the guidance of producers and recording engineers. The course is also about pulling together all the elements of a finished recording: pre-production, recording the various tracks, mixing, mastering and working with a photographer and graphic designer for the packaging (even digital only audio releases are paired with some sort of packaging design and artwork.)

Corequisite: WA 374

DMWA students only

Recording an EP is where the student does what songwriters, recording artists and songwriting worship leaders do in the real world: they make a record of their creative work. This course is that – recording the EP under the guidance of producers and recording engineers. The course is also about pulling together all the elements of a finished recording: pre-production, recording the various tracks, mixing, mastering and working with a photographer and graphic designer for the packaging (even digital only audio releases are paired with some sort of packaging design and artwork.)

Corequisite: WA 373

Additional Fees: $6,615 Recording Fee, $1,005 Service Fee

DMWA students only

Recording an EP is where the student does what songwriters, recording artists and songwriting worship leaders do in the real world: they make a record of their creative work. This course is that – recording the EP under the guidance of producers and recording engineers. The course is also about pulling together all the elements of a finished recording: pre-production, recording the various tracks, mixing, mastering and working with a photographer and graphic designer for the packaging (even digital only audio releases are paired with some sort of packaging design and artwork.)

This course is designed as an integrated practical work experience in cooperation with a local church in order to provide the student with a supervised and evaluated experience in active worship ministry by qualified field supervisors/trainers.

Youth Ministry Courses

An introduction to contemporary youth ministry. Students will examine youth culture, various models of youth ministry, the Biblical and theological foundations for reaching and disciplining today’s youth as well as a short study on the history of youth ministry. The areas of programming, teaching, recruiting, volunteers, administration, developing relationships with students, and personal care in youth ministry will also be covered.

This course examines the teaching methodology of Jesus in principles and practice for teachers of youth. The student will be introduced to several curriculum design processes that will help you become more effective teachers. We will explore several teaching methods that bring lessons to life with feeling and impact.

This course is designed to help the student gain an understanding of personal/relational issues and cultural influences faced by pre-teens and teens in today’s world. We will be exploring such issues as suicide, cutting, loneliness, sexual activity, pornography and many others. Students will be better equipped to teach and counsel teens on the issues they face in life.

This course is designed to help the student be better equipped to speak into the lives of teens. Students learn how to prepare talks and sermons that will leave a lasting impression on the audience. Students get experience speaking in a variety of public settings throughout the course.

Students who have credit in PA 211 Passionate Preaching and Teaching cannot take this class for credit.

Prerequisite: YO 224 Creative Teaching Methods

Includes travel in the Spring

This unique course meets six times during the semester and then takes a 10-12 day “road trip” to youth organizations and churches across Western Canada. Involves study of various types of youth ministry and first-hand observation of how they are practiced. Students strive to understand the philosophy and structure of each organization and ministry and how they are reaching teens in today’s culture.

Note: Course additional fee will be $250.00 to help cover the cost of fuel and transportation. Students will also be responsible for their own food costs on the trip. Accommodation will be looked after. Offered in alternate years.

Prerequisite: YO 151 Introduction to Youth Ministry

This course is designed to cover a variety of topics that a person going into full-time youth ministry will encounter. Some examples are leadership development, staff dynamics, being a team player, leading week-long youth events, evangelism, and altar calls.

Students who have credit in PA 480 Topics in Pastoral Ministry cannot take this class for credit.